District 7

Belinda Conaway, the two-term incumbent from a longtime Baltimore political family, was also criticized for residing outside her district, but unlike Ms. Spector, who forthrightly acknowledged her living arrangements and the reasons for them, Ms. Conaway's answers became even more enigmatic under questioning, and she filed a $21 million libel suit against a blogger who first raised the issue. When the suit was dropped a few months later, after the blogger provided proof in court that Ms. Conaway had signed papers attesting that she lived in the Baltimore County residence, voters were left with an impression of reckless overreaction and poor judgment ill-befitting an elected official. Fortunately, there is a practical alternative in Nick Mosby, an electrical engineer for <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ORCRP016243" title="Verizon Communications" href="/topic/economy-business-finance/computing-information-technology-industry/telecommunication-service/verizon-communications-ORCRP016243.topic">Verizon</a> who has been active in neighborhood groups and who has won the support of labor organizations. Mr. Mosby has some fresh ideas on growing Baltimore's population through a graduated property tax and a performance-based evaluation of city departments to make them more efficient.

Belinda Conaway, the two-term incumbent from a longtime Baltimore political family, was also criticized for residing outside her district, but unlike Ms. Spector, who forthrightly acknowledged her living arrangements and the reasons for them, Ms. Conaway's answers became even more enigmatic under questioning, and she filed a $21 million libel suit against a blogger who first raised the issue. When the suit was dropped a few months later, after the blogger provided proof in court that Ms. Conaway had signed papers attesting that she lived in the Baltimore County residence, voters were left with an impression of reckless overreaction and poor judgment ill-befitting an elected official. Fortunately, there is a practical alternative in Nick Mosby, an electrical engineer for Verizon who has been active in neighborhood groups and who has won the support of labor organizations. Mr. Mosby has some fresh ideas on growing Baltimore's population through a graduated property tax and a performance-based evaluation of city departments to make them more efficient.

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