"As soon as A observes something which seems to him to be wrong, from which X is suffering, A talks it over with B, and A and B then propose to get a law passed to remedy the evil and help X. Their law always proposes to determine what C shall do for X, or the better case, what A, B and C shall do for X. … What I want to do is to look up C. I want to show you what manner of man he is. I call him the Forgotten Man. Perhaps the appellation is not strictly correct.  He is the man who never is thought of. … He works, he votes, generally he prays — but he always pays."

 --William Graham Sumner

As the Maryland General Assembly convenes its annual legislative session today, all manner of special interests will descend upon Annapolis seeking to — all apologies to Fred Reed — feed the 188 commoditized temple monkeys searching for the next bribe.

  • Governor O’Malley’s former aides turned lobbyists will come to the do bidding of well-heeled rent seekers, and with a wink and a nod — like Henry Hill’s lawyer in Good Fellas — get what they want;
  • The environmentalists will come for their ban on fracking, and to make sure tax revenue from the storm water management fee keeps raining;
  • Even the stoners will come for their legal weed, and the temple monkeys will give them due consideration just for the contact high of extra revenue from taxing the sale of pot;
  • All of rent seekers will come to make sure their goodies get into to a state budget that O’Malley says he cut more than any governor in history, but which still grows every year.

Who won’t be represented in Annapolis?  The forgotten man, the taxpayer!  

 Someone has to pay for this bacchanal on the Severn, and as Sumner said, we always pay. 

--Mark Newgent has contributed commentary to The Washington Examiner and National Review Online, and he is an frequent guest on WBAL Radio. His posts appear here regularly via Red Maryland, which has strived to be the premier blog and radio network of conservative and Republican politics and ideas in the free state since 2007.