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News Opinion Readers Respond

Death in Waverly doomed to be repeated, unless we stop it [Letter]

A terrible thing happened in Waverly this month. An innocent precious little girl was taken from us due to violence ("Funeral today for 3-year-old Baltimore girl killed by gunfire," Aug. 8). The community with politicians at their side are uniting and taking a stand to the senseless violence.

But will it work?

Thirty-nine years ago, an elderly women, Millie Alcarese, who lived in the same neighborhood, was walking up to Greenmount Avenue when she was jumped and robbed (stealing her pocketbook) by three punk thugs. Millie fell to the ground in the attack, her head crashing to the concrete. She died later that day.

Then-Mayor William Donald Shaefer chimed in on the violence. The thugs were caught. In their defense it was suggested Millie aided her own demise by holding onto her pocketbook. If she had let go she would not have fallen.

The day following this attack neighborhood tensions grew. Racial lines were drawn. Mayor Shaefer intervened. As time passed memories faded and the issue seem to be overcome by events, except for the family that will never forget.

Shortly after Millie's death, her cousin Alphonso Alcarese was robbed and beaten in his shoe repair shop on Gorsuch Avenue, a short distance from Millie's mugging. Not long after that Mr. Alcarese closed his shop.

Four years later Mr. Alcarese's wife Daniella was a passenger in a car that was carjacked by another punk thug. The driver was thrown from the car, and Mrs. Alcarese, half in and out of the car, was wedged when the car struck another parked car. All this happened in Waverly on Gorsuch Avenue. The criminal ran from the crashed vehicle but by chance a guardian angel was in the area. He saw the commotion, chased and caught the thug and took the upper hand in a physical confrontation.

Emotions are currently running high and rightfully so. However, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake needs to ensure there is a viable curative plan in place. The community needs to demand to see that plan or otherwise 39 years from now it is likely someone will be taking the time to write another article like this because of senseless violence.

William F. Alcarese, Baltimore

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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