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Waste to energy plant should not be built

Thank you for the article "As permits expired, work began on waste to energy plant in city" (Aug. 9). I do not understand why regulators allow Energy Answers to keep going forward on their waste to energy incinerator despite missing deadlines.

Waste to energy may make sense in Denmark where these plants are put in the communities that produce the waste, including wealthy communities and where there is a high rate of recycling (61 percent compared to our 29 percent) that has already reduced the waste stream before incineration. In Energy Answers; case, this waste is imported and sent to a community that, as the Sun reporter Tim Wheeler points out, is already overburdened with the highest level of toxic pollution in the state.

While this plant may claim that it exceeds air quality requirements, that does not mean much. Measurements are infrequent and not during relatively dirty start up or cool down periods. The permit allows heavy metal, particulates and volatile organic compounds into the air. These are pollutants that cause cardiac, respiratory and neurological disease as well as cause cancer.

This company is from Albany, N.Y., but our air and water and soil are being polluted and our children are being harmed. We are Marylanders, and Curtis Bay children are our children. I think the only thing green about this incinerator is the money it makes for a company that has chosen to locate its plant in our state.

Dr. Gwen L. DuBois

The writer is a member of Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility and the Crabshell Alliance.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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