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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Smart transportation projects could improve the quality of life in Baltimore City

I was happy to see the benefits of intermodal transportation for city residents so clearly described in a recent Sun commentary ("Put people ahead of cars," June 5). I've begun to see a transformation over the last decade in Baltimore, and I am encouraged that we may yet see more improvement in the future.

As a daily commuter from Baltimore to Washington, D.C., intermodal transportation is a way of life for me. Each morning I set out from my Lauraville neighborhood to Penn Station by bicycle and catch the MARC train to Union Station.

From there I rent a Capitol Bikeshare bike and pedal to my office in Georgetown. As an alternative on cold winter days, I can easily hop the D.C. Circulator or the Metro rail line to my destination and arrive safely and on time.

However, I am struck by the disparity between the safety, supportive infrastructure and relative ease of getting around D.C. by foot, bicycle, bus, train or metro compared to the limited and disconnected choices I have in Baltimore City.

I agree with the article's authors that now is the time to seize the momentum that has been building and really establish healthy, safe and walkable neighborhoods that will retain and increase the number of pedestrians, bicyclists and public transportation users in Baltimore City.

IA bike share program, bicycle boulevards and efficient public transportation that connects all neighborhoods within the city all help create safer streets for everyone. Increasing the infrastructure to support people, rather than cars, will increase support for community businesses by the individuals who walk past them each day rather than speed by in locked cars. It would also greatly improve the perception that Baltimore is a world-class city with opportunities for successful business, families, neighborhoods and tourism.

This is an important time for the future of transportation in Baltimore City. Thank you for calling attention to these important issues.

Elizabeth Jones, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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