Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Smart transportation projects could improve the quality of life in Baltimore City

I was happy to see the benefits of intermodal transportation for city residents so clearly described in a recent Sun commentary ("Put people ahead of cars," June 5). I've begun to see a transformation over the last decade in Baltimore, and I am encouraged that we may yet see more improvement in the future.

As a daily commuter from Baltimore to Washington, D.C., intermodal transportation is a way of life for me. Each morning I set out from my Lauraville neighborhood to Penn Station by bicycle and catch the MARC train to Union Station.

From there I rent a Capitol Bikeshare bike and pedal to my office in Georgetown. As an alternative on cold winter days, I can easily hop the D.C. Circulator or the Metro rail line to my destination and arrive safely and on time.

However, I am struck by the disparity between the safety, supportive infrastructure and relative ease of getting around D.C. by foot, bicycle, bus, train or metro compared to the limited and disconnected choices I have in Baltimore City.

I agree with the article's authors that now is the time to seize the momentum that has been building and really establish healthy, safe and walkable neighborhoods that will retain and increase the number of pedestrians, bicyclists and public transportation users in Baltimore City.

IA bike share program, bicycle boulevards and efficient public transportation that connects all neighborhoods within the city all help create safer streets for everyone. Increasing the infrastructure to support people, rather than cars, will increase support for community businesses by the individuals who walk past them each day rather than speed by in locked cars. It would also greatly improve the perception that Baltimore is a world-class city with opportunities for successful business, families, neighborhoods and tourism.

This is an important time for the future of transportation in Baltimore City. Thank you for calling attention to these important issues.

Elizabeth Jones, Baltimore

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Put people ahead of cars
    Put people ahead of cars

    Under new leadership, Baltimore's Transportation Department must prioritize bicycling, walking and public transit

  • Marching for McKenzie
    Marching for McKenzie

    Here's a thought: Why don't the people who believe there's social injustice and have the time to demonstrate hold a march on the 3600 block of Old York Road to protest the neighbors who aren't coming forth to identify those who shot and killed 3-year-old McKenzie Elliott earlier this year...

  • Taliban misrepresents Islam
    Taliban misrepresents Islam

    What possible crime could a young student have committed that he or she deserves death? Can't think of any, right? This is what was going through the minds of horror stricken parents in Peshawar, Pakistan ("Horror in Peshawar," Dec. 16).

  • In Md., deficits are nothing new
    In Md., deficits are nothing new

    "Somewhere along the way, as Maryland's revenue picture went from bad to worse, a scary term entered the Annapolis lexicon: the 'structural deficit.'" So said The Baltimore Sun on February 9, 2003 as then-Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. proposed a plan to wipe out a $2 billion dollar shortfall...

  • Md. leaders protect funds for bay cleanup
    Md. leaders protect funds for bay cleanup

    Senators Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin, along with Rep. Steny Hoyer, deserve our thanks for securing funding in the recent omnibus appropriations bill to keep Maryland on track to cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams ("For better or worse, spending bill passes," Dec. 15).

  • CIA interrogators should not be punished
    CIA interrogators should not be punished

    I strongly suggest anyone who agrees with letter writer Max Obuszewski's idea to punish the CIA personnel who did their job under the direction of our government read about the torture inflicted upon our own troops in past wars and conflicts ("Failure to punish the CIA torturers means they will...

  • Revisit 'old-school' police programs
    Revisit 'old-school' police programs

    The recent influx of citizen unrest due to a rash of officer-related homicides has left the American citizenry skeptical of the greater good police departments bring to communities nationwide, especially that of traditionally violent neighborhoods that tend to have a majority of minority...

  • Torture can never be justified
    Torture can never be justified

    The Senate report's summary of the "enhanced interrogation" techniques the CIA used on terrorist detainees after 9/11 reads like something from a horror novel ("CIA strikes back after Senate torture report," Dec....

Comments
Loading