Get unlimited digital access to baltimoresun.com. $0.99 for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Smart transportation projects could improve the quality of life in Baltimore City

I was happy to see the benefits of intermodal transportation for city residents so clearly described in a recent Sun commentary ("Put people ahead of cars," June 5). I've begun to see a transformation over the last decade in Baltimore, and I am encouraged that we may yet see more improvement in the future.

As a daily commuter from Baltimore to Washington, D.C., intermodal transportation is a way of life for me. Each morning I set out from my Lauraville neighborhood to Penn Station by bicycle and catch the MARC train to Union Station.

From there I rent a Capitol Bikeshare bike and pedal to my office in Georgetown. As an alternative on cold winter days, I can easily hop the D.C. Circulator or the Metro rail line to my destination and arrive safely and on time.

However, I am struck by the disparity between the safety, supportive infrastructure and relative ease of getting around D.C. by foot, bicycle, bus, train or metro compared to the limited and disconnected choices I have in Baltimore City.

I agree with the article's authors that now is the time to seize the momentum that has been building and really establish healthy, safe and walkable neighborhoods that will retain and increase the number of pedestrians, bicyclists and public transportation users in Baltimore City.

IA bike share program, bicycle boulevards and efficient public transportation that connects all neighborhoods within the city all help create safer streets for everyone. Increasing the infrastructure to support people, rather than cars, will increase support for community businesses by the individuals who walk past them each day rather than speed by in locked cars. It would also greatly improve the perception that Baltimore is a world-class city with opportunities for successful business, families, neighborhoods and tourism.

This is an important time for the future of transportation in Baltimore City. Thank you for calling attention to these important issues.

Elizabeth Jones, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Congress has right to hear Netanyahu
    Congress has right to hear Netanyahu

    In his commentary ("Boehner's unwise move," Jan. 28), Frederic B. Hill claims it was unwise for House Speaker John Boehner to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to speak at a joint session of Congress because it shows deference toward him before an Israeli election.

  • Sick leave can be a lifesaver
    Sick leave can be a lifesaver

    I'm offended by the comments of Del. Kathy Szeliga about whether Maryland should mandate paid sick days ("Lawmakers put paid sick leave on agenda," Jan. 26). I don't need paid sick days to fish. I need paid sick days and job protection because I have cancer and lost my job when I took time...

  • City schools need to re-examine spending
    City schools need to re-examine spending

    Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake recently told legislators that the budget cuts in state education proposed by Gov. Larry Hogan would harm the city and its school system ("Aid cuts hurt city, mayor says," Jan. 28). However, I believe that budget cuts might be just the catalyst needed...

  • Netanyahu speech: Neither unprecedented nor unwise
    Netanyahu speech: Neither unprecedented nor unwise

    Op-ed writer Frederic Hill ("Netanyahu invitation unwise," Jan. 28) faults House Speaker John Boehner for inviting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to speak to Congress two weeks before Israeli elections. "Democratic nations usually do not interfere in another country's vote," Mr. Hill says.

  • Secret Service remains top-notch
    Secret Service remains top-notch

    It is unfortunate that the recent behavior of some Secret Service agents has over-shadowed the agency's reputation for protecting the president and vice president, former presidents, U.S. Supreme Court justices, cabinet members and their families.

  • Obamacare has raised costs
    Obamacare has raised costs

    I read with interest the news regarding the increased cost of drugs for those who have signed on with the Affordable Care Act. I am one of those who went from a co-pay of zero to a monthly cost of $299.62 for medication to control a chronic illness, ulcerative colitis. There is no cure and...

Comments
Loading