Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Mandating union dues is unfair [Letter]

Thank you for the thoughtful editorial on the Supreme Court case of Harris v. Quinn ("Paying one's dues," Jan. 23). While it may seem reasonable to force people to pay union dues in order to engage in commerce, it might be more reasonable to consider the possibility that people should be free to engage in commerce on their own terms. Why did Illinois decide to treat these people as employees in the first place? After all, the doctors who receive Medicare funds are not state employees. And the real beneficiary of the Medicaid funds is the person receiving the care. Is it possible that this arrangement was designed to give political favor to the union?

You make the argument that ruling in favor of the plaintiff would deny the right of workers to join unions. That is simply not the case. In no way is a worker's right to organize in jeopardy. What is at risk is the monopoly power that unions receive from government. No attempt to cloud this privilege with appeals to resolving inequality can change that fact. I find it ironic that you suggest that people should exercise their right to associate by finding work elsewhere. If we were truly free to associate, then there would be no need to work elsewhere.

Jeff Taylor, Odenton

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Red Line's demise was not personal

    Red Line's demise was not personal

    A recent column by Dan Rodricks made it look like Gov. Larry Hogan is feuding with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake over the Red Line ("Hogan, Rawlings-Blake blow opportunity born in unrest," June 28).

  • The Red Line never made sense

    The Red Line never made sense

    Letter writer Benjamin Rosenberg was correct in calling the killer of the Red Line the "extraordinarily expensive and redundant downtown tunnel" ("Red Line was fatally flawed," June 29).

  • O's fans mistreated by MTA

    O's fans mistreated by MTA

    The Maryland Transit Administration advertises light rail service for one hour after the end of Orioles games. This did not happen on Sunday, June 28. The game was over at 10 p.m., and there was no southbound train until a complaint was made and a train came at midnight.

  • Reimer had grit

    Reimer had grit

    I first met Susan Reimer when she was a young sports reporter given post-game access to the Baltimore Colts locker room well before it occurred to anyone to give robes to the players for those interviews ("Susan Reimer signs off," June 25).

  • Light rail alternative?

    Light rail alternative?

    Maybe it is time to investigate the use of trolley buses again ("Hogan says no to Red Line, yes to Purple," June 25).

  • Hogan should stay on the job if he can

    Hogan should stay on the job if he can

    I've been reading about Gov. Larry Hogan's recent cancer diagnosis and the treatment he will soon require, but while concerns regarding his ability to govern are not entirely unfounded they hardly merit calls for him to step down ("Hogan should resign," June 25).

Comments
Loading

81°