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News Opinion Readers Respond

Direct growth to cities and towns

The commentary "Put people ahead of cars" (June 5) was very stimulating and well written. I have been saying something similar for years. I do believe the focus is a little misdirected.

While all the author's points are valid, and I have great respect to for them, I think it might be a little off. The auto is isn't going away. The percentage of people interested in biking to work is very small. The focus of the piece is to put infrastructure to accommodate transit, biking and walking where the people are.

I would suggest we might be better by turning that equation upside down and putting people where the infrastructure and population centers already exist. That is, stimulate affordable attractive housing where the infrastructure is. The added population would almost be required to use public transportation infrastructure. Thus, there would be added fare revenue to the system and provide funds for improving that infrastructure. This would help alleviate traffic congestion among other benefits gained by adding population in our population centers.

There would be regional political acceptance of this in that it would lessen traffic congestion for those commuting from the counties and lessen development pressure in the counties that eat up open space.

Money already exists in federal and state budgets to help accomplish this action. It needs to be redirected. Focus on housing and increasing the population in our population centers.

Mel Mintz, Pikesville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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