Get unlimited digital access to baltimoresun.com. $0.99 for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Direct growth to cities and towns

The commentary "Put people ahead of cars" (June 5) was very stimulating and well written. I have been saying something similar for years. I do believe the focus is a little misdirected.

While all the author's points are valid, and I have great respect to for them, I think it might be a little off. The auto is isn't going away. The percentage of people interested in biking to work is very small. The focus of the piece is to put infrastructure to accommodate transit, biking and walking where the people are.

I would suggest we might be better by turning that equation upside down and putting people where the infrastructure and population centers already exist. That is, stimulate affordable attractive housing where the infrastructure is. The added population would almost be required to use public transportation infrastructure. Thus, there would be added fare revenue to the system and provide funds for improving that infrastructure. This would help alleviate traffic congestion among other benefits gained by adding population in our population centers.

There would be regional political acceptance of this in that it would lessen traffic congestion for those commuting from the counties and lessen development pressure in the counties that eat up open space.

Money already exists in federal and state budgets to help accomplish this action. It needs to be redirected. Focus on housing and increasing the population in our population centers.

Mel Mintz, Pikesville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Congress has right to hear Netanyahu
    Congress has right to hear Netanyahu

    In his commentary ("Boehner's unwise move," Jan. 28), Frederic B. Hill claims it was unwise for House Speaker John Boehner to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to speak at a joint session of Congress because it shows deference toward him before an Israeli election.

  • Sick leave can be a lifesaver
    Sick leave can be a lifesaver

    I'm offended by the comments of Del. Kathy Szeliga about whether Maryland should mandate paid sick days ("Lawmakers put paid sick leave on agenda," Jan. 26). I don't need paid sick days to fish. I need paid sick days and job protection because I have cancer and lost my job when I took time...

  • City schools need to re-examine spending
    City schools need to re-examine spending

    Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake recently told legislators that the budget cuts in state education proposed by Gov. Larry Hogan would harm the city and its school system ("Aid cuts hurt city, mayor says," Jan. 28). However, I believe that budget cuts might be just the catalyst needed...

  • Netanyahu speech: Neither unprecedented nor unwise
    Netanyahu speech: Neither unprecedented nor unwise

    Op-ed writer Frederic Hill ("Netanyahu invitation unwise," Jan. 28) faults House Speaker John Boehner for inviting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to speak to Congress two weeks before Israeli elections. "Democratic nations usually do not interfere in another country's vote," Mr. Hill says.

  • Secret Service remains top-notch
    Secret Service remains top-notch

    It is unfortunate that the recent behavior of some Secret Service agents has over-shadowed the agency's reputation for protecting the president and vice president, former presidents, U.S. Supreme Court justices, cabinet members and their families.

  • Obamacare has raised costs
    Obamacare has raised costs

    I read with interest the news regarding the increased cost of drugs for those who have signed on with the Affordable Care Act. I am one of those who went from a co-pay of zero to a monthly cost of $299.62 for medication to control a chronic illness, ulcerative colitis. There is no cure and...

Comments
Loading