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News Opinion Readers Respond

Grow Baltimore with better walkability, more transit

I think is interesting that Thursday's editorial, "Growing Baltimore" (Jan. 3), included two paragraphs about how walkability and quality transit have helped to spark growth in Washington, D.C., but only a short sentence about the Charm City Circulator when discussing Baltimore. I commend The Sun for getting it right about D.C. But that begs the question: If quality transit has been so important to the revival to the city 40 miles to the south, why isn't it important to Baltimore's future?

I think it is. Baltimore needs to develop a realistic transportation plan that can address how people can get around the parts of Baltimore built before World War I — what used to be and to some extent still is a walking and transit city. Big chunks of the old city are ignored by decision makers or seen as a big insoluble problem. Fortunately, neighborhoods like these have seen tremendous revivals in other cities. The Sun is right; high quality transit is a big part of the solution. But the circular isn't going to cut it. A more robust and permanent solution is required.

Peter Duvall

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