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What does the tea party say after Okla. tornadoes?

I ask the tea party, as it campaigns for extreme cuts in government services, would it cut the National Weather Service? If it had been cut, who would have let the people in Oklahoma know that they needed to get into shelters to be safe from tornadoes? How many more would have died if they had not been warned?

Throughout the country, funds are being cut from the budgets of first responders. In Oklahoma, New Jersey and other areas just this year ravaged by storms, budgets are being cut. Who would save our children, our people, if not for the first responders? Who? And we must never forget the first responders who gave their lives on 9/11 and other days every year.

Throughout the country, education budgets have been cut and teachers have been vilified; yet time after time, in Oklahoma, Connecticut other places, we hear the stories about our teachers who throw their bodies over their students in an effort to save our youngsters, even though they are critically wounded or the worst case scenario, they give their lives to save their students. What would we do without our teachers?

Of course we must not forget that in times of tragedy, which seem almost a common occurrence in this day and time, states seek help from the federal government, help that saves lives and aids communities in their effort to rebuild; if not the government, then who?

Yes, we, as taxpayers expect government to be efficient and cost effective. But do we really want to destroy the very foundation that makes our community and our country great?

Dr. Carol A. Silberg, Hunt Valley

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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