A dim view of term limits is mostly held by (who would guess) politicians and, recently, The Sun's editorial board ("The reality of term limits," Jan. 1).

Why should voters fear term limits? States with term limited legislatures rank in the top half in employment, GDP and net migration.

Newly elected members of the legislature have (or should have) plenty of experience. We should be electing public service-oriented people and not "neophytes" seeking the lifetime career path that gentlemen such as House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have done. If their idea of public service can't be accomplished in 12 years, then there is something wrong with it. Do term limits hinder the president or the governor ? They certainly aren't deterred from diverting an inordinate amount of their "limited" time from the people's business to maneuvering for higher office or re-election. And the editors' notion that the power of political parties and special interests is encumbered by incumbents as opposed to challengers is just about the silliest thing I've ever heard, especially when it comes to politics in Maryland.

The Sun is concerned that Del. Michael J. Hough would subvert a system "that dares allow voters alone to decide" how long someone should serve. This from editors who would oppose every referendum that was a gleam in a conservative's eye. Confused?

With a nod to the late Ron Smith, here is an idea: The legislature should spend 20 days every session repealing useless laws. Excellent training for the newly elected and, when they are finished, there shouldn't be much need for this discussion, as even they should see the virtues of term limits. Failing that, we could try transplanting the editors from Baltimore to Birmingham, Ala. Somehow I think they would then be clamoring for term limits.

Mark Brown, Bowley's Quarters

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