Get unlimited digital access to baltimoresun.com. $0.99 for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Will the public notice the governor's pension shell game?

Will there ever be a time when the Sun editorial board will present an objective case outlining all the pros and cons of an issue? Their latest failing is their position regarding teacher pensions and who should pay for them ("Kamenetz stands alone," Feb. 22).

The assumption, it seems, by the Sun, Gov.Martin O'Malleyand now Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is that local teacher pension costs should be paid at the local level. It seems to me that the Governor is trying to unload costs from his already bloated 35+ billion dollar budget, and he is using the pension cost move to do that, and proposes that somehow, in the Sun staff's opinion, an "elegant solution," would be to raise taxes in a way that would increase the "piggy back" payment back to the counties. Voila, the pension cost increases at the county level are paid for.

Do the governor, the county executive, and the Sun editors really believe that the public will not notice that this feat of financial legerdemain is occurring and will blindly endorse the tax increase? I think not.

A better course would be to leave the pension system alone until a complete analysis of the best way to cost effectively manage the plan is prepared and presented to the electorate. If it is such a good idea, the analysis will show it and will be easy to sell to the citizenry.

Silly me, I am assuming that the people will pay any more attention to this issue than they pay to their individual rights.

Sam Davis, Towson

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Kamenetz stands alone
    Kamenetz stands alone

    Our view: The Baltimore County executive is facing reality on the teacher pension issue; his colleagues should realize it's in their best interests to join him

  • Hogan's poultry manure regulations are full of holes
    Hogan's poultry manure regulations are full of holes

    Gov. Larry Hogan's proposed regulations for controlling poultry manure pollution that is feeding fish-killing "dead zones" in the Chesapeake Bay are flawed by a loophole that may lead to endless delay in solving the problem ("Hogan proposes curbs on farm pollution," Feb. 23).

  • Senator Barb, a city landmark
    Senator Barb, a city landmark

    Barb Mikulski called me the walking tour lady, though how I crossed her radar was a puzzle to me, at least for a while. I stood a few feet from her Monday morning and dissolved in tears as she told of choosing to raise hell instead of raising money for another run for the U.S. Senate ("Hail...

  • Mayor came through on Horseshoe community impact funds
    Mayor came through on Horseshoe community impact funds

    It is with great pleasure that I read in Saturday's edition, "More money promised for utility work near casino" (Feb. 28) since I was critical of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Board of Estimates for initially proposing to take the entire $3 million from the community impact funds. I...

  • No poachers need apply
    No poachers need apply

    I enjoyed the article about state legislators who choose to live in or near Annapolis during the 90-day winter legislative session ("Maryland's part-time lawmakers seek balance between family life, public service," March 1).

  • Parents oppose armed school police because they don't trust them
    Parents oppose armed school police because they don't trust them

    The Sun correctly identified trust as issue at the heart of the debate over whether school police officers should be allowed to carry weapons inside school buildings ("A matter of trust," Feb. 27).

  • 'Rain tax' has a bad rap
    'Rain tax' has a bad rap

    The so-called "rain" tax was a practical approach to reducing pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, but it got twisted around to be seen as another liberal agenda tax ("End 'rain tax' ridicule rap, repeal and replace law," Feb. 28).

  • Netanyahu speech a fiasco
    Netanyahu speech a fiasco

    From its inception, Israel and its supporters in America have influenced our political system not for what is best for America but for Israel's interest. President Harry Truman compromised on his and the State Department's opinion on how Israel should be founded due to political pressure and...

Comments
Loading