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The tea party will win despite Virginia

Tea Party MovementLaws and LegislationMedicaidSame-Sex Marriage

Your editorial suggesting that Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's loss in the gubernatorial race there is a sign that the country is tired of the tea party may well be true ("An election with a message," Nov. 6).

Like a teenager who tires of his mother harping on him to stop over-drafting his account and maxing out his credit cards, the country may well be pitching a tantrum. But that is irrelevant. We tea partyers are number crunchers, and we're looking at the books and telling the country it can't continue on this track.

While our opponents paint us as religious zealots, a huge portion of the tea party is agnostic, like myself, or atheist. That's not the core of the tea party.

It's absurd for a president to advertise a stimulus bill of nearly $1 trillion dollars as necessary to build the country's infrastructure when barely 5 percent of that goes to infrastructure. It sure would be nice right now to have had spent that whole stimulus on infrastructure, because not only did we spend the money, we still have an infrastructure problem.

While our opponents paint us as pro-life zealots, a huge portion of the tea party, including me, support abortion. That's not the core of the tea party. We point out that policies that result in the shrinking of the American workforce to the lowest point in decades like this administration has done, while increasing deficit spending, are guaranteed to result in disaster. It is a mathematical certainty. There is no magic potion that will allow the government to spend more with a shrinking workforce and shrinking revenue.

While our opponents paint us as homophobic, a huge portion of the tea party supports gay marriage. That's not what the tea party is about. The core of the tea party rails against a health care bill that's sold to Americans as some sort of human rights triumph because it offers insurance to people with preexisting conditions. But it actually results in more people being thrown off their coverage, leaves 30 million-plus people uninsured, since the people losing their health care is outpacing the people acquiring it. Not only that, but the bill swells the Medicaid's rolls, a program that is already underfunded.

The arguments against the tea party are all ad hominem attacks. The president and his allies say you can't trust what we say because we're racists and radicals. Math doesn't give a damn what race you are. Allowing a health care plan that adds another $2 trillion to our debt over the next decade, kicks people off their plan and doesn't provide a way for them to get a new plan be fixed before it goes into effect without trying everything in their power — including a government shutdown — isn't radial, it's responsible. The irresponsible parties are those who insist on going forward without making sure it works first.

Sure, the American people may be tired of what we're saying. It may cost the GOP some victories because the press seems to be perfectly willing to take whatever this administration says at face value when it comes to finances.

But it is a mathematical certainty that a country that spends as much as we do, and takes in as little in taxes relative to what we spend, will wind up in ruins. Either there will be big cuts in Medicaid, big cuts in Medicare, insanely higher taxes that completely choke off business, or a devaluing of the dollar to the point that it's worth pennies compared to what it can buy today.

There is no escaping it, no matter how many tantrums the teenager that is America throws. The longer it takes to wake up and face the problem, the harder it will be to fix. Vilify us if you want, we'll still be here when you're ready to be reasonable.

Fred Pasek, Frederick

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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