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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

A man jumps into traffic and nobody stops?

I woke up to the news that a man had taken his life by jumping off an overpass on I-795 ("Man dies after jump from I-795 overpass; hit by multiple cars," April 2). Sadly, this is not the first, nor will it be the last time an incident like this happens.

It's what happened after this man jumped that has me particularly concerned. The man's body was struck by several cars. The particularly galling aspect to this tragedy is twofold. A human being loses his life, and no one stopped. That is truly a perverse and unnerving thought. What if this person were your husband, or brother, co-worker, or golf buddy?

Have we become that inured to death? It seems that the concept of sanctity of life has become so diluted in our nation. We blame it on whatever we wish to, but it seems we have devolved socially. We become hopelessly obsessed with our schedules, agendas and appointments. These become tantamount to everything that is occurring outside our bubble. And, yes, many of us have become so very selfish. We get done what needs to be done and to hell with others. Is that the American way?

It reviles me how so many have so little respect for something as unique and precious as life itself. It behooves us as a nation to reassess our priorities before we continue the downward spiral as it pertains to how much (or how little) value we place on the extraordinary gift of life.

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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