Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Bloomberg's soda battle draws parallel to our nation's public health activism

Melissa Healey's article, "NYC's failed cap on sugary drinks prompts soul searching" on April 4 draws an interesting parallel between New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's improbable public health battle against obesity and our nation's long history of public health activism and success stories.

Taking on the "larger forces" through policy — whether the tobacco and alcohol industries or "Big Food" — is a winning model in public health. The impact of taking on corporate interests is best appreciated in individual behavioral change. As a registered dietitian, my endless "empty calories" and "extra pounds" health advice to my dad made not a drop of difference in his habits. However, he stopped drinking soda completely when he learned about the mayor's plan to ban large sugary drinks, and he has since lost 10 pounds.

Mayor Bloomberg and other public health officials understand the good that comes out of taking on corporations to create environments in which the healthy choice is the easy choice.

Danielle Schaub

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • The full story of Bloomberg's failed big soda ban

      Your editorial about a recent court decision invalidating the so-called "soda ban" in New York City ("Bloomberg loses the soda battle, not the war," March 12, 2013) offered an incomplete explanation of why the judge ruled the ban "arbitrary and capricious." The judge referred to "loopholes,"...

    • Who cares what the CIA does to terrorists?
      Who cares what the CIA does to terrorists?

      Am I living in the Twilight Zone? It sure seem so when I read some of the liberal nonsense being regurgitated in The Sun concerning the Senate Democrats' release of their CIA report on torture ("Holding the CIA to account," Dec. 9).

    • What's the bang for our health exchange buck?
      What's the bang for our health exchange buck?

      The article, "Health exchange enrolls over 100,000 people" (Dec. 17), was informative, and I hope reporter Meredith Cohn has a follow up.

    • Marching for McKenzie
      Marching for McKenzie

      Here's a thought: Why don't the people who believe there's social injustice and have the time to demonstrate hold a march on the 3600 block of Old York Road to protest the neighbors who aren't coming forth to identify those who shot and killed 3-year-old McKenzie Elliott earlier this year...

    • Taliban misrepresents Islam
      Taliban misrepresents Islam

      What possible crime could a young student have committed that he or she deserves death? Can't think of any, right? This is what was going through the minds of horror stricken parents in Peshawar, Pakistan ("Horror in Peshawar," Dec. 16).

    • In Md., deficits are nothing new
      In Md., deficits are nothing new

      "Somewhere along the way, as Maryland's revenue picture went from bad to worse, a scary term entered the Annapolis lexicon: the 'structural deficit.'" So said The Baltimore Sun on February 9, 2003 as then-Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. proposed a plan to wipe out a $2 billion dollar shortfall...

    Comments
    Loading