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Marylanders are struggling under the state's constant tax and fee increases

Your recent editorial on stormwater fees made me burst out laughing with tears streaming from my eyes — hopefully, liquid that will not one day to be considered taxable run-off ("The rain tax sham," April 18).

You opine that "we think it's far more sensible to expect polluters to clean up after themselves — and in this case, that means all of us." In response to that statement, I couldn't help but think of the Sunday morning televangelist shouting at us "repent, you nasty polluters, repent!"

You may feel free to wrap yourselves in self-flagellation, but don't drag me under your repressed umbrella. It is water coming from the sky and has been for millions of years.

The fact that one owns a home or, even worse, is one of those dreaded business owners with a parking lot, can only mean they need to be yoked with more taxes.

The charade is that money from this tax will be used to finance "a dedicated fund that goes directly to cleaning up a problem." Just like money in the state's Transportation Trust Fund has only been used for transportation projects?

But why more taxes at all? Were we not led to believe the increase in the sales tax several years ago, the 2011 increases in the bridge and tunnel tolls, the alcohol tax, the 2012 doubling of the "flush tax," the increase in the tobacco tax and the coming hike in the gas tax and vehicle registration fees were all to be Maryland's saviors?

With its constant over-reliance on taxes and gambling, the political leadership in Maryland has proven once again it lacks the competency to build a long-term strategy for true economic growth. Is it moving Maryland forward? I think not.

Stuart Entwistle, Towson

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