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News Opinion Readers Respond

Government must admit its mistakes [Letter]

There are many failed policies, yet the federal, state and local governments are always reluctant to pull the plug on their failures ("Pot fears expose fears about societal health," Feb. 27). Jack Welch, former chairman and CEO of General Electric, arguably one of the greatest leaders of big business ever, admits that GE made many errors on projects — after significant time, money and technology had been invested and then decided to pull the plug because it made sense not to continue on a negative path. GE absorbed the losses and embarrassment and moved on to profitable projects.

The difference between big business and our government is that business makes decisions based on what is good for business. Government at all levels needs to learn how to run their business and take some lessons from the private sector. If they are or were held accountable for a "bottom line," it would be a totally different story. Obviously this isn't just about this issue, but about many failed policies! Realizing that the government is not in business for profit, but for successful policy, is the first step in achieving true reform.

Thanks to Dan Rodricks for raising the issue of government's failure in the war on drugs. I always enjoy his columns. I don't always agree, but that is what makes it interesting!

Chip Gachot, Finksburg

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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