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The only 'dialogue' Snowden has started is whether he's a traitor or not

The Edward Snowden who once said he was prepared to "take his lumps" for releasing secret U.S. documents is now rethinking his position ("Snowden stays put in Moscow," June 25).

This self-styled crusader for freedom and transparency is desperately trying to get to Ecuador, a dictatorship with little if any freedom of the press. And Mr. Snowden's travel plans seem anything but transparent.

Perhaps he has realized that his fleeting bit of fame isn't exactly what he had hoped. Perhaps the "national dialogue" on security and surveillance that he said he wanted to start — with himself as the Great Moderator — isn't working out as he thought. The only dialogue now is whether Mr. Snowden is a traitor or not.

He's a sad case, running and hiding in countries that are hardly symbols of freedom of thought and expression, and trying to avoid the consequences of his own actions.

It's time for Mr. Snowden to come out from behind a computer screen and participate in life, even though that life may not be the one of luxury he was enjoying while undermining his generous employer and betraying his government.

Steven Sutor

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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