Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

Little Sisters should respect workers [Letter]

Since their arrival in Baltimore, the Little Sisters of the Poor have contributed much to the care of the elderly ("Nuns fight health law," Dec. 23). Originally, the Little Sisters financed this care by begging, as there was no government assistance. They had to supply everything for the elderly in their care.

That model changed many years ago with the advent of the federal government safety net for the low income elderly. Currently, the Little Sisters are no more poor than their fellow nuns, and the residents of their homes are no more poor than the residents of many other nursing homes receiving funds from the federal government. The big difference is that you can count on the quality of care provided and the tender loving treatment they provide their residents.

As the federal government does not provide for some amenities that we now see as one step above basic needs, the nuns have continued to beg for help. However, I am concerned by the challenge of the Little Sisters are making to the federal government health care law. What right do they have to monitor or limit the medical treatment of their employees? We are not operating in a feudal society where the employer has strict controls over the entire life of the employee.

What happened to medical privacy and freedom of conscience? I believe that the Little Sisters are displaying a lack of respect for their employees. I also believe that they should be grateful for the federal government assistance that they and their residents have been receiving for many years.

Edward McCarey McDonnell, Baltimore

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Let veterans patrol the border
    Let veterans patrol the border

    Recently I heard President Obama's wife, Michelle, express her concern about veterans ("Give a veteran a chance," Nov. 10).

  • Land deal still looks sleazy
    Land deal still looks sleazy

    Dan Rodricks must be dizzy from all the spin he has put on Gov. Martin O'Malley's land deal that Comptroller Peter Franchot accurately characterized as "sleazy" ("Land deal obscures a pretty good idea," Nov. 20).

  • Thankful for Obama's climate efforts
    Thankful for Obama's climate efforts

    The carbon emissions with which we humans pollute our atmosphere threaten to cause monumental environmental problems ("Climate breakthrough," Nov. 12). We here in the U.S. are among the worst offenders. Yet many in Congress are content to ignore this problem in pursuit of short term economic...

  • Sun hits a moral low in editorial on Jerusalem attack
    Sun hits a moral low in editorial on Jerusalem attack

    The recent editorial in The Sun regarding the attack in Jerusalem set a new low in moral equivalency ("Tragedy in Jerusalem," Nov. 20). The editorial board spent all of two sentences stating that there is no justification for such an attack and then went on to explain how both sides have been...

  • O'Malley's new phosphorous rules are key to a clean bay

    Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed rules to limit pollution from manure are good for everyone who wants clean water ("Phosphorus rules, finally," Nov. 18). Experts say the phosphorus management tool is one of the biggest opportunities to clean up the Chesapeake Bay and local waters in more than 30...

  • Obama lies again and again
    Obama lies again and again

    Here we go again. Lies, lies and more lies from President Barack Obama. The list includes but is not limited to: Fast and Furious, Benghazi, the IRS corruption, the VA scandal and the Affordable Care Act also called Obamacare.

Comments
Loading