Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Mandatory paid sick leave won't help workers

Mandatory paid sick leave isn't the cure-all that op-ed writer Paul Kinzie makes it out to be. ("Paid sick leave for food workers makes us all healthier," August 7). There's a growing body of evidence that shows that these laws actually hurt the employees they're intended to help.

For instance, a study by the Institute for Women's Policy Research — a group supportive of paid sick leave laws — found that nearly 30 percent of San Francisco's lowest-wage employees reported layoffs or reduced hours at their place of work following that city's passage of a paid leave mandate. Another survey by the Urban Institute found that some city employers had scaled back on employee bonuses, vacation time and part-time help to adapt to the law's costs, while studies in Connecticut and Seattle have also found that some employees have even lost their hours of work or their jobs following the passage of mandatory paid leave laws.

Hopefully these facts will serve as a helpful reminder that when it comes to business mandates, good intentions don't necessarily lead to good policy.

Michael Saltsman

The writer is research director of the Employment Policies Institute.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Preakness and Pimlico are inseparable

    Preakness and Pimlico are inseparable

    Although it may be true that the Pimlico race track needs an update, the Preakness should never leave Baltimore ("Is sun setting on Preakness at Pimlico?" May 17).

  • School money could make a difference

    School money could make a difference

    They're killing Baltimore. No, I am not talking about all the senseless shootings and murders that have occurred since the beginning of the year, nor am I talking about the death of Freddie Gray and the riots that followed.

  • How women entrepreneurs can help rebuild Baltimore

    How women entrepreneurs can help rebuild Baltimore

    As The Sun's Natalie Sherman correctly pointed out ("Selling Baltimore after the rioting," May 16), increasing investment prospects is critical to the growth of Baltimore's business community. Historically, women entrepreneurs have had and will continue to have a significant impact on the local...

  • Parallel parking will soon be a lost art

    Parallel parking will soon be a lost art

    The MVA's decision to drop parallel parking from its driving exam promises nothing good ("Md. driver's test no longer includes parallel parking," May 20).

  • Yes, the rioters were thugs

    Yes, the rioters were thugs

    Writer Lia Purpuna's reflections on the unrest triggered by the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody were sophomoric, inaccurate and selectively incomplete ("Baltimore writers reflect on Freddie Gray's death," May 16).

  • Watch out for drunk drivers this weekend

    Watch out for drunk drivers this weekend

    While The Baltimore Sun is helping to usher in a celebrated time of year otherwise known as summer ("Memorial Day weekend travel projected to be busiest in a decade," May 20), the next three months are also a dangerous time of year when it comes to highway safety.

Comments
Loading

81°