In Case You Missed It: Baltimore Running Festival photos
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

Streamline the state legislature

Michael E. BuschExecutive BranchThomas V. Mike MillerDemocratic PartyMaryland General AssemblyMartin O'Malley

Reading about the recently-concluded special session gave me an idea ("O'Malley faces political risks of tax increases," May 17). Seeing as how this session was called only after Gov. Martin O'Malley, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch sat down and drew up what they wanted the budget to be and then called in the Maryland General Assembly to rubber stamp it, why not do away with the 90-day regular session we have been having every year?

Then, Governor O'Malley, Senator Miller, and Delegate Busch can just get together and decide what they want in the way of tax increases, fees, increased fines, increased tolls, expanded gambling, etc. and call a special session two or three times a year for two or three days at a time so the legislature can rubber stamp their desires. Think of how much money that would save. Plus, we wouldn't have to have all the rhetoric, debates, or filibusters to slow down the process.

If they wanted to save even more money, perhaps we could forget calling special sessions and just have the General Assembly members vote on the Internet. Same results and cheaper still. And the Democrats in the State House wouldn't take the risk of looking bad for being forced to come back to Annapolis when they couldn't get things done in the 90 days allotted the regular session.

David Gosey, Towson

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
Michael E. BuschExecutive BranchThomas V. Mike MillerDemocratic PartyMaryland General AssemblyMartin O'Malley
  • Maryland's unfriendly business climate kills another 1,000 jobs
    Maryland's unfriendly business climate kills another 1,000 jobs

    Maryland is incredibly unfriendly to business with its heavy burden of regulations, high taxes and an out-of-control minority business enterprise extortion process that enriches a few African-Americans without hiring the inner city minorities it is designed to assist ("The Bechtel blame...

  • Don't let Maryland turn into Illinois [Letter]
    Don't let Maryland turn into Illinois [Letter]

    On the same day that The Baltimore Sun publishes "As recovery continues, Maryland households fall behind" (Oct. 11), the newspaper also prints an article about the trucker shortage ("Trucker shortage looms large as Baltimore port eyes growth").

  • Spending cuts aren't cheap [Letter]
    Spending cuts aren't cheap [Letter]

    A reader argues that overspending is the problem in Annapolis ("Maryland's spending problem," Sept. 29).

  • Maryland's spending problem [Letter]
    Maryland's spending problem [Letter]

    Dreary job reports coupled with the news that Maryland is projecting $405 million in less revenue for the current fiscal year and the next has caused the O'Malley/Brown cheerleaders at The Sun to put on the pompoms and go into full attack mode ("Apocalypse? Not now," Sept. 26)....

  • Politics as usual on state budget numbers [Letter]
    Politics as usual on state budget numbers [Letter]

    Having spent 47 years in state and local government, I have a pretty good feel for impending fiscal year budget problems ("Apocalypse? Not now," Sept. 26). The very quietly issued projections for the next fiscal year for the state budget are concerning. That the state has already,...

  • High taxes = lost jobs = deficit [Letter]
    High taxes = lost jobs = deficit [Letter]

    Why doesn't The Sun ask Gov. Martin O'Malley if taxing the businesses that left the state or did not locate here in the first place because of the high taxes had anything to do with declining tax revenue ("The budget apocalypse that isn't," Sept. 26)? That will be the...

  • The budget apocalypse that isn't [Editorial]
    The budget apocalypse that isn't [Editorial]

    Our view: Are new revenue estimates a reason to look for spending cuts? Yes. Are they a repudiation of the O'Malley fiscal and economic legacy? Hardly

  • Why seniors leave Maryland [Letter]
    Why seniors leave Maryland [Letter]

    As a retiree who held his first job at age 11 and who worked and paid into Social Security for 50 years and into Medicare since it's inception, that obnoxious diatribe by William Smith is an affront to retirees everywhere ("Who needs those lazy retirees?" Aug. 19).

Comments
Loading