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Hogan order reflects a skewed view of what education is for

The governor has held school funds hostage, called out teachers and shortened the school year.

When my children, now 35 and 29, were young they started school after Labor Day. When that changed to before Labor Day, I was not happy. But we adjusted and I even started looking forward to school in August.

Most families we knew started preparing their children two weeks before school started. The children started going to bed at their school time and getting up at their school time. Most families did not go away over the Labor Day weekend even when school started after Labor Day.

Today, it is very common for families to take vacations during the school year. Unlike when my children were in school, no one thinks it unusual to pull their children out of school for vacation.

Watching the news this weekend, I saw that most of those interviewed about how the impending storm would impact their plans seemed to be young people — in other words, people who don't have children.

Because of my daughter's and son-in-law's jobs and schedules, I am very involved in my grandson's life. I take him to sports practices and games, to scout meetings and school functions. This summer my husband and I used a workbook to keep his skills fresh.

My husband commented, before school started that our grandson might have really struggled when school opened if we hadn't worked with him. It makes me wonder what will happen to children who did not have someone to work with them over the summer.

State Del. Eric Luedtke is right to accuse State Comptroller Peter Franchot of pandering. The post-Labor Day school start has been one of his favorite causes. For years, he held a news conference in Ocean City over the Labor Day weekend to champion a later start to the school year.

This even occurred during former Gov. Martin O'Malley's terms. But in Larry Hogan Mr. Franchot now has a governor who was elected because he promised to revive Maryland's economy.

Governor Hogan, however, should know that education is the best way to revive the economy. If people can read, write and do math, they have a much better chance of getting and keeping a job.

I am very disappointed in Mr. Hogan's attitude toward education. He has held education funding hostage, called out teachers and now interfered with the school year. I would seriously consider another choice for governor in the next election if his attitude doesn't change.

Michelle Peyton

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