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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Classroom violence is a problem in the county, too [Letter]

Your recent expose and editorial on violence in the Baltimore City public schools is proof positive that someone in the school system is hiding the dirt and intimidating teachers and other staff ("Curbing classroom violence," Feb. 17).

And that's only the tip of the iceberg. When I read the article I thought I was reading about Baltimore County's public schools. Your reporters have been made aware of the same misconduct among administrators and staff in that school system, but you have chosen to ignore the fact that county bus drivers, attendants and students are all experiencing the same atrocities you reported in the city school system.

As a former school bus driver with BCPS, I have suffered assaults by students and parents. The Transportation Department has hidden information and elected to ignore my suffering as well as that of other drivers and attendants.

I have requested that the superintendent conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud, criminal acts, abuse of employees in the transportation department, cronyism, and appointment of people to positions they are not qualified to hold. His reaction and that of the transportation department has been to "terminate the whistle-blower."

There are employees in the county school system who have been seriously injured and incurred medical and ancillary expenses far exceeding what is being spent in the city school system. If The Sun wishes to do the right thing for county employees and students it will investigate these allegations.

Lawrence Diggs, Bel Air

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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