Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99
News Opinion Readers Respond

Classroom violence is a problem in the county, too [Letter]

Your recent expose and editorial on violence in the Baltimore City public schools is proof positive that someone in the school system is hiding the dirt and intimidating teachers and other staff ("Curbing classroom violence," Feb. 17).

And that's only the tip of the iceberg. When I read the article I thought I was reading about Baltimore County's public schools. Your reporters have been made aware of the same misconduct among administrators and staff in that school system, but you have chosen to ignore the fact that county bus drivers, attendants and students are all experiencing the same atrocities you reported in the city school system.

As a former school bus driver with BCPS, I have suffered assaults by students and parents. The Transportation Department has hidden information and elected to ignore my suffering as well as that of other drivers and attendants.

I have requested that the superintendent conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud, criminal acts, abuse of employees in the transportation department, cronyism, and appointment of people to positions they are not qualified to hold. His reaction and that of the transportation department has been to "terminate the whistle-blower."

There are employees in the county school system who have been seriously injured and incurred medical and ancillary expenses far exceeding what is being spent in the city school system. If The Sun wishes to do the right thing for county employees and students it will investigate these allegations.

Lawrence Diggs, Bel Air

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Charter school roadblock
    Charter school roadblock

    Republican Gov. Larry Hogan campaigned on a pledge to increase the number of charter schools in the state, which currently has one of the most restrictive charter school laws in the nation. By making charter schools easier to open and operate in Maryland, the governor hopes to give parents more...

  • Charter schools and public accountability
    Charter schools and public accountability

    The charter school bill currently in the Maryland General Assembly would not permit schools run by "private institutions" ("Miller urges senators to pass Hogan's charter bill," March 17).

  • Moving forward in city schools
    Moving forward in city schools

    Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton says he wants to roll back some aspects of his predecessor's policy that gave principals more authority over budget and staffing decisions at their schools. No doubt some adjustments are due in the governance structure instituted by former schools CEO...

  • Rebuilding trust
    Rebuilding trust

    Baltimore's legislative delegation on Friday backed off its support for a plan to allow the city's School Police Force, which is separate from the Baltimore City Police Department, to carry guns inside school buildings. The city school board never offered a convincing rationale for proposing...

  • Charter schools alone aren't enough
    Charter schools alone aren't enough

    Thanks for David W. Hornbeck's trenchant commentary on charter schools ("Charter schools do not equal education reform," Feb. 27).

  • Parents oppose armed school police because they don't trust them
    Parents oppose armed school police because they don't trust them

    The Sun correctly identified trust as issue at the heart of the debate over whether school police officers should be allowed to carry weapons inside school buildings ("A matter of trust," Feb. 27).

Comments
Loading