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News Opinion Readers Respond

School violence requires thoughtful approach [Letter]

If city lawmakers "were shocked" by school violence, I'm shocked by our lawmakers ("City Council plans hearings on violence directed at teachers," Feb. 18)! What rock do they live under? I'd heard rumblings about attacks on teachers, but I had no idea it was so prevalent in Baltimore. This is unacceptable.

On a number of occasions, I've offered to volunteer at neighborhood schools but never had a reply. I felt badly at the time but now see why I wasn't wanted around.

The Sun's report states during in the last fiscal year teachers filed "more than 300 workers' compensation claims … related to assaults or run-ins." That's 300 too many! Today, we accept a 24/7 surveillance culture, so why not put video monitoring devices in classroom and hallways? Then when a dangerous confrontation occurs, school police could be on the scene immediately. No questions asked.

It's also despicable that teachers are made to feel guilty when they report student violence. Looks like "blame the victim" is alive and well in our city schools.

Roz Ellis, Baltimore

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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