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School discipline has been a long-standing problem [Letter]

Perhaps the Baltimore City Council should go back and read Jane Sundius' commentary from earlier this year ("Guidelines aim to end disparity in school discipline," Jan. 9).

There she chastised the school system for putting far too many students out of the classroom for minor offenses and quoted approvingly U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan when he said that "it is adult behavior that has to change."

Really? As any educator knows, it starts with minor offenses, and if we let these behaviors slide we soon wind up with teachers being physically harmed. A parent who lets misbehavior slide soon regrets it when they try, too late, to reprimand their child.

Yet our nation's top educator states that the adults behavior needs to change. Where did he teach — or has he ever done it?

When federal officials visited Baltimore's Frederick Douglass High School they unveiled new school discipline guidelines. I would suggest The Sun get a copy of these and print them for the City Council as well as readers.

These assaults have been going on for quite some time — decades, in fact — and for the education committee chairwoman of the council to say she was "shocked" by such incidents is disingenuous at best.

Roland Moskal

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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