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News Opinion Readers Respond

The price of keeping unruly, obnoxious kids in class

The headline on your recent editorial about out-of-school suspensions should have read "Preventing unnecessary suspensions and keeping the bully In school ("Keeping kids in class," Jan. 18).

You say the program aimed at reducing out-of-school suspensions requires a tricky balance to make sure the financial incentives to teachers and principals eliminate the suspensions that are not needed but not the ones that are. And you refer to talking back as a nonviolent nuisance.

As a retired teacher, I say that when a student curses you out and threatens violence, calling it counterproductive to remove that student from class is wrong on several levels.

It's the behavior that is counterproductive. Learning stops, the class waits while you give the offender a soap box to continue and the teacher loses authority.

That hinders the learning process, which is after all the goal of our school system. One individual's antics deprives 30 or more others of the opportunity to learn. Schools CEO Andrés Alonso should do the math.

Roland Moskal

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