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News Opinion Readers Respond

Teachers should not have to fear for their safety [Letter]

Kudos to Erica Green, Scott Calvert, and Luke Broadwater for their excellent article "The classroom as a battleground" (Feb. 16). As the husband of a retired Baltimore City school teacher, I can attest to some of the abuses outlined in the article.

The last time my wife was assaulted, she was "head butted" in the back by one of her third grade students. Her principal "urged" her not to file a report, as he thought it best for the student not to be punished.

The quote by Jimmy Gittings, president of the principal's union, that "no principal is intimidating any teacher for recommending a student for disciplinary action" is blatantly false. My wife and many of her colleagues were hesitant to report physical abuses because not only would their principal not back them up, he would actually shift the blame to them. He could be quite vindictive.

I think it is truly sad when teachers have to fear for their safety, and then fear for their jobs by despotic administrators.

Jerry Kurman, Owings Mills

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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