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News Opinion Readers Respond

Worried about climate change? Go vegan

Hurricane Sandy is one more dramatic demonstration that climate change and its extreme weather patterns are now part of our future.

Although we're unlikely to reverse climate change, we can still mitigate its effects by reducing our driving, our energy use and our meat consumption.

Yes, meat consumption. A 2006 United Nations report estimated that meat consumption accounts for 18 percent of man-made greenhouse gases. A 2009 article in the respected World Watch magazine suggested the real figure may be closer to 50 percent.

Carbon dioxide, the principal greenhouse gas, is emitted by burning forests to create animal pastures and by combustion of fossil fuels to confine, feed, transport and slaughter animals and refrigerate their carcasses. The much more damaging methane and nitrous oxide gases are discharged from the digestive tracts of cattle and from animal waste.

We have the power to reduce the devastating effects of climate change every time we eat. Our local supermarket offers a rich variety of soy-based lunch "meats," hot dogs, veggie burgers, soy and nut-based dairy products (including cheese and ice cream) and an ample selection of traditional vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts. Product lists, easy recipes, and transition tips are available at http://www.livevegan.org.

Bill Canterbury, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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