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Baltimore region needs transit not transit phobia

Recently, Greater Fern-Glen Community Association President Sandra German wrote a screed against the light rail ("Why Glen Burnie is opposed to light rail,” Aug. 2). As a user of the light rail and buses in the Baltimore area, Ms. German's commentary deeply concerns me. The public transit system in the Baltimore area shouldn't be cut back further, but rather should be expanded.

In 1965, as a recent article by D.W. Rowlands on the web site Greater Greater Washington noted ("Baltimore once had an elevated streetcar along Guilford Avenue," July 31), Baltimore received money from the federal government to study a regional rapid transit system. Three years later, the city released a report proposing a "71-mile system with six branches radiating from downtown." If the system had been built, Baltimore's subway system would be comparable to the Washington, D.C. Metro. In 1971, rather than approving a complete transit system, a 28-mile initial plan was proposed, consisting of two lines which would later become the Baltimore Metro subway route (opened in 1983) and light rail line (opened in 1992). Sadly, the southern branch of the subway was cut due to opposition from Anne Arundel County residents. In this sense, the commentary by Ms. German is in keeping with historical mores!

As for what Ms. German had to say, it is not fair to paint the light rail's users as a bunch of criminals. The majority of those who use the service are well-natured individuals going to and from their jobs, those going to sports games, tourists, or those going to the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, to name a few reasons. The point of a mass transit system is that everyone can use it, including some who are seen, rightly or wrongly, as unsavory types.

The same applies to the bus system. Recently, Baltimore County Council members David Marks and Cathy Bevins have said that the bus service stop at The Avenue in White Marsh should be closed at 11 p.m. because of "large crowds of youth in the evening on the weekends," claiming the youth are disruptive, uncontrollable and harming their own safety, after a recent fight at the White Marsh Mall (“Baltimore County council members urge MTA to reduce bus service to White Marsh Mall area after fight,” Aug. 8). For those who use such mass transit, especially those who are transit-dependent, it is not right to stigmatize them because doing so makes it clear there is a "race issue" at play rather than a concern about public safety, despite what Ms. Bevins told The Sun.

Eliminating the Glen Burnie stop of the light rail would be another blow at the inadequate public transit system of Baltimore. Apart from having a better-run light rail or a Red Line in Baltimore, which is advocated by many, including the Baltimore Transit Equity Coalition, there needs to be a full-throated mass transit system for Baltimore. Already, the SmarTrip Card is part of the WMATA system, so why not have a physical connection between Baltimore and D.C. by rail? Additionally, Annapolis should be connected to Baltimore, possibly by extending the light rail beyond Glen Burnie, in order to further tie the state together. Having a complete and working mass transit system for the Baltimore area, rather than one outranked by those of Miami, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Atlanta, San Francisco, D.C., Chicago, Boston, and New York, is vital.

It is time that Baltimore live up to its motto still inscribed on many city benches ("The Greatest City in America") by creating a world-class transit system, building upon the existing and inadequate transit system to make something that will benefit the people of the Baltimore area.

Burkely Hermann, Towson

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