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Ehrlich's self-interest is showing again

Once again, Bob Ehrlich shows that his trickery is not limited to election day voting schemes ("Give pols a pass for verbal miscues," March 18). The start of his column promises an uplifting theme — let's cut politicians some slack on some of their statements because they're human and thus imperfect. But Mr. Ehrlich quickly turns to nakedly partisan attacks by listing statements that do not deserve any slack — those of Democrats.

He starts off with what he calls President Barack Obama's propensity for apologizing to the world for U.S. policy. This is a favorite line of Mitt Romney, for whose presidential campaign Bob Ehrlich is state chairman, and other right-wing hustlers, but it just does not ring true. Note that the column does not provide a single example of any such statements by the president.

Mr. Ehrlich needs to show some responsibility for his statements and provide examples of Mr. Obama apologizing "to the world" for U.S. policy. He's entitled to his opinions but not his own facts.

As for The Sun, if you are going to give op-ed page space to Mr. Romney's state chairman to make partisan attacks on his opponent in the guise of opinion, then you should provide op-ed space on the same day for Mr. Obama's state campaign chairman.

Wilbur Carroll, Columbia

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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