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News Opinion Readers Respond

Not all welcome Red Line

Your article regarding the proposed Red Line in Baltimore ("Red Line interest high," June 11) is not complete. You report 400 contractors, engineering firms, investment bankers and rail-car manufacturers attended the meeting to inquire about how they can get a share of the money proposed for the Red Line.

What you leave out is the input from the Canton residents who don't want it. Several reasons they give are the line running down the middle of Boston Street and the fact that portions of Boston Street lie within a flood plain.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says it will create jobs, connect the city to the suburbs and improve neighborhoods and create an economic plus. Maybe Mayor Rawlings-Blake should come out to Owings Mills and review the mall that looks like a ghost town at the end of the Metro subway line and tell the unemployed people what a economic plus the Metro is. Better yet, she could tell the local volunteer fire company she is sorry city residents disrupted the carnival on the Metro lot, which caused it to be canceled in later years. This was the main revenue for an all-volunteer fire company.

Your article also points out the increase in the gas tax will raise expectations for funding. Why do my gas taxes go to fund public transportation instead of fixing the roads we currently have? Let the people who use public transportation pay for the cost and raise their fares instead of my gas tax.

J. Michael Collins, Reisterstown

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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