Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Psychedelics have way more potential than medical marijuana [Letter]

Op-ed writer Nate Greenslit is exactly correct in arguing that it would benefit the proponents of the use of psychedelics to focus the discussion toward the treatment of medical ailments ("Are psychedelics the next medical marijuana?" Aug. 6). However, unlike medical marijuana, which is primarily being used to treat pain and glaucoma, the benefits to the field of psychotherapy and healing from psychedelics is enormous.

Psychedelics actually have the potential cure depression, anxiety, phobias, PTSD and other mental illness. Psychedelics, specifically natural plant ethnobotanicals like ayahuasca, have also been demonstrated to be effective in treating alcohol and drug addiction. Medical studies being conducted at Johns Hopkins and New York University suggest that both psilocybin and MDMA therapy help in the treatment of imminent death related anxiety.

But this type of healing is nothing new to jungle shaman who for centuries have been using plant based psychedelics for treatment to heal the ill in their communities. It is long overdue that the government allow the study of all psychedelics. Many leading authorities suggest that they will be integrated into regular medical treatment programs within 10 years.

Seti Gershberg

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Where's the outrage when an officer is shot?
    Where's the outrage when an officer is shot?

    The Rev. Al Sharpton appeared on C-Span last Saturday in advance of his protest rally in Washington and said he doesn't discriminate when he protests shootings.

  • What about Pa. manure?
    What about Pa. manure?

    On an almost recurring basis lately, The Sun has devoted itself to bringing to everyone's attention the Eastern Shore poultry industry's polluted runoff flowing into the Chesapeake Bay ("Larry Hogan has a chance to be a green governor," Dec. 13). Attention should be directed to the Amish...

  • Unaffordable care in Bel Air
    Unaffordable care in Bel Air

    I am 59 years old, have been a practicing family physician for 30 years and I can't wait to pay my new health care premium for 2015. This past year, I paid $680 a month for my wife and me with a $5,400 deductible. With the Affordable Care Act, in 2015, I will be paying $700 a month with a...

  • Chicken industry threatens all other bay businesses
    Chicken industry threatens all other bay businesses

    Dan Rodricks' column on Gov.-elect Larry Hogan and the Chesapeake Bay missed an important fact: Mr. Hogan's pro-poultry industry comments and pledges are actually deeply hurtful to most Eastern Shore businesses ("Larry Hogan has a chance to be a green governor," Dec. 13).

  • Md. needs outpatient commitment
    Md. needs outpatient commitment

    The article by Meredith Cohn, "Involuntary treatment for the mentally ill in Maryland" (Dec. 10) and your editorial, "Refusing treatment" (Dec. 11), are very accurate. I know because I have had to deal with my son's refusal to take any medication for many years. He is psychotic and very...

  • Outpatient commitment law is crucial
    Outpatient commitment law is crucial

    In response to The Sun's recent editorial, "Refusing treatment" (Dec. 11), what disability rights groups omit when they say that "assertive community outpatient services" are better than outpatient civil commitment for the seriously mentally are the following sad and enduring facts.

Comments
Loading