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News Opinion Readers Respond

Suburban poverty is growing and demands new solutions

Of course, Barbara Samuels is correct in pointing out the deep economic disparities between Baltimore City and its surrounding metropolitan counties ("Poverty still hits the city hardest," Oct. 16). The city's rate of poverty, at nearly 25 percent, far exceeds
the rates found in the suburbs. Still, the rise in suburban poverty is worth noting. It's also important to observe that, as of 2012, there were more children living in poverty in the five counties ringing the city than in the city itself. That means that poverty can no longer be viewed as a city only problem. Political and civic leaders across the metropolitan area have reason to find common cause in addressing poverty and reducing its devastating
effects.

Josef Nathanson, BaltimoreThe writer is president of Urban Information Associates, Inc, a Baltimore-based community and economic development consulting firm.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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