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News Opinion Readers Respond

EPA rule won't hurt Baltimore's port [Letter]

My experience in the real world of ocean transportation does not agree with several of Stephen J. Brooks' assertions in his March 1 piece, "Rule could hurt port."

International Maritime Organization regulations apply to all ships calling at all North American ports.

The North American Emission Control Area (ECA), under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, went into effect on Aug. 1, 2012, bringing in stricter controls on emissions of sulfur oxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter for ships trading off the coasts of Canada, the United States and the French overseas collectivity of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon.

The EPA was not responsible for the implementation of that law. We calculate whether it is more cost effective to travel extra distance at higher speed to use lower cost fuel longer or use the more expensive fuel to reduce distance or avoid bad weather. All ships entering within 200 nautical miles of North America must change over to low sulfur fuel, and compliance can be enforced by all Port State Control authorities around the world.

Just because some people in the USA have a near vision that the world should be a pollution dump, it doesn't mean that the rest of the world is on board. Pay now or pay later, it always costs more to pay later.

Captain Jack Boak, Baltimore

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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