Get unlimited digital access to baltimoresun.com. $0.99 for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Half of Maryland wants to leave [Letter]

What tripe! The Sun's recent editorial twisted the Gallup poll to prove that people aren't leaving Maryland because of the numerous tax hikes out of Annapolis ("Movin' out?" May 12).

People do not leave a state for solely one reason. For the 47 percent of Marylanders who want to leave, taxes were fourth on the list. Being fourth behind family, work and climate make taxes significant. Rather than state that we are the 47th unhappiest state in the Union and being concerned about it, the editorial board makes excuses that the poll was taken during sequestration, that we have an older work force wanting to move to warmer climes and that the D.C. suburbs have federal workers who "pine to be elsewhere."

The Sun also drew the conclusion that the lesser dissatisfaction in the public school system was because of the higher taxes being used for education. I could conclude that the lower dissatisfaction was due to an older population who didn't care about public education. Neither was a conclusion of the study and both are wrong.

Fact: In most states only one quarter to one third of residents would leave, but in Maryland almost one half would leave. The top reasons for leaving are work, family, climate and taxes. One-half of Maryland, along with their money and talents, wants to leave and the only thing we can control are taxes. Wake-up Annapolis, half your state wants to leave!

Steven Pinson, Baltimore

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • The 'spin' isn't the story [Letter]
    The 'spin' isn't the story [Letter]

    Maryland ranked third in a recent Gallup poll with residents who would "prefer" to leave the state in which they reside if they were able to do so. Naturally The Sun put its own spin on that very clear finding ("Maryland's unhappy residents," May 9).

  • Unfilled jobs save the state money
    Unfilled jobs save the state money

    Letter writer William M. Libercci Sr. complains that he doesn't understand how eliminating unfilled state positions reduces the deficit ("Budgetary smoke and mirrors," Jan. 9).

  • O'Malley cost Md. jobs
    O'Malley cost Md. jobs

    Gov. Martin O'Malley blames the Maryland deficit on everything except his own actions as governor ("O'Malley legacy marked by gains, taxes," Jan. 20). Because of his excessive taxes on Maryland citizens and businesses, many have escaped this state and moved to other states including...

  • Hogan should set an example on pay cuts
    Hogan should set an example on pay cuts

    The Sun has reported that Gov. Larry Hogan has proposed cutting the pay for Maryland state employees ("Hogan tightening belt in Md. budget," compensation is the silliest item in the state's budget.

  • Md. is great for retirement
    Md. is great for retirement

    This letter is for Gov. Larry Hogan and those considering retirement in the great state of Maryland ("Hogan misses the difference between campaigning and governing," Feb. 4).

  • Can Hogan get state spending under control?
    Can Hogan get state spending under control?

    A recent report failed to recognize that the major contributors to Maryland's and every other state's fiscal problems are their government employee pension plans ("Business groups look to reduce tax burden for some," Dec. 5).

  • Turning a blind eye to mental illness
    Turning a blind eye to mental illness

    We were outraged to read that mental health funding was slashed by the Board of Public Works earlier this month in order to close a state budget gap ("Balancing Md.'s budget on the backs of the mentally ill," Jan. 21).

  • Three big ways Hogan can save tax money
    Three big ways Hogan can save tax money

    Dear Larry —

Comments
Loading