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News Opinion Readers Respond

Half of Maryland wants to leave [Letter]

What tripe! The Sun's recent editorial twisted the Gallup poll to prove that people aren't leaving Maryland because of the numerous tax hikes out of Annapolis ("Movin' out?" May 12).

People do not leave a state for solely one reason. For the 47 percent of Marylanders who want to leave, taxes were fourth on the list. Being fourth behind family, work and climate make taxes significant. Rather than state that we are the 47th unhappiest state in the Union and being concerned about it, the editorial board makes excuses that the poll was taken during sequestration, that we have an older work force wanting to move to warmer climes and that the D.C. suburbs have federal workers who "pine to be elsewhere."

The Sun also drew the conclusion that the lesser dissatisfaction in the public school system was because of the higher taxes being used for education. I could conclude that the lower dissatisfaction was due to an older population who didn't care about public education. Neither was a conclusion of the study and both are wrong.

Fact: In most states only one quarter to one third of residents would leave, but in Maryland almost one half would leave. The top reasons for leaving are work, family, climate and taxes. One-half of Maryland, along with their money and talents, wants to leave and the only thing we can control are taxes. Wake-up Annapolis, half your state wants to leave!

Steven Pinson, Baltimore

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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