Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

City should yield on police, fire pensions

Pension and WelfareInterior PolicyJustice SystemStephanie Rawlings-Blake

The Sun editorial ("In defeat, a victory," Sept. 24) claims that the City of Baltimore was within its rights to make unilateral changes to fire and police pensions. Federal Judge Marvin Garbis ruled that the city ordinance was unconstitutional.

It appears that the editorial board at the Sun believes contracts are made to be broken. In 2009, the fire officers, fire fighters and the Fraternal Order of Police approached the city administration with a proposal that would have saved Baltimore over $80 million in pension costs. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the city council chose to enact the ordinance instead with a total disregard to the City Code.

The City also had ample opportunities during the three trials to sever the ordinance but instead chose, in no uncertain terms, to make it an all-or-nothing proposition. The City now has the right to appeal this decision and continue to spend taxpayer dollars on this litigation or they can acknowledge the efforts by the unions to reach a compromise and move everyone forward. Judge Garbis has requested that all parties meet with him in mid-October.

Michael B. Campbell, Baltimore

The writer is president of Baltimore Fire Officers L-964.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
Pension and WelfareInterior PolicyJustice SystemStephanie Rawlings-Blake
  • Voting machine problems suspicious
    Voting machine problems suspicious

    Registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans by a 2-to-1 ratio in Maryland, yet in the race for governor, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown is only two points ahead of Republican Larry Hogan ("Maryland governor's race sparks national interest," Oct. 27). More than 50 voters have...

  • Wrong to privatize water
    Wrong to privatize water

    Despite what the mayor's office has claimed, there is a very real threat that a contract with Veolia under any name could result in privatization down the line. This is why I participated in the One Baltimore rally to oppose any water contract with Veolia and for keeping our water...

  • The 97 percent
    The 97 percent

    Regarding your report "About 3 percent of teachers in Md. rated ineffective" (Oct. 28), I am curious why you didn't headline the article "41 percent of teachers in Md. rated highly effective" or "97 percent of teachers rated either effective or highly...

  • Fear-mongering tactics mar Watson campaign
    Fear-mongering tactics mar Watson campaign

    Your endorsement of Allan Kittleman for Howard County executive correctly compliments both candidates on their ideas and plans for the county ("Kittleman for county executive," Oct. 27).

  • Don't throw money at body cameras
    Don't throw money at body cameras

    Before running off and spending money on body cameras for Baltimore police officers ("City Council panel pushes ahead on body cameras bill," Oct. 29), anyone with any authority who is so convinced that cameras are the answer to police misconduct should read a recent study published...

  • Psychiatry, science and humility (or lack thereof)
    Psychiatry, science and humility (or lack thereof)

    Mark Komrad's one-sided portrayal of psychiatry is as misleading as the Hollywood productions he criticizes ("Fiction does a disservice to psychiatry," Oct. 23). In this mental health utopia, "modern psychiatric medication" and "state of the art treatment"...

Comments
Loading