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Poe House reopening a credit to Baltimoreans [Letter]

The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City.

This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose.

It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations." De Tocqueville made a stop in Baltimore during his American tour in the early 1830s. In that tradition, citizens interested in preserving the local history associated with Poe, and his legacy in America's journalistic world, formed the non-profit, organization Poe Baltimore. This new group was responsible for the reopening of the Poe House on May 24th.

Poe was a pioneer in the creation of the short stories and detective mysteries. He is studied and examined in writing classes throughout the world. His life was certainly nonconformist and significantly strange. Having family connections in Baltimore since childhood, it is no surprise that he was found dead in a Baltimore street in 1849, at the age of 40.

After the city of Baltimore did not choose to fund various museums, Poe Baltimore was organized to fund, maintain and interpret the Poe House, and indeed one of Baltimore's most famous citizens. The Poe House offers tourism and educational opportunities. These opportunities are only enhanced by the name of Baltimore's football team, The Ravens. Thank you, Mr. Poe.

Baltimoreans can enhance this legacy by supporting Poe Baltimore.

Fletcher R. Hall, Ruxton

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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