Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Poe House reopening a credit to Baltimoreans [Letter]

The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City.

This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose.

It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations." De Tocqueville made a stop in Baltimore during his American tour in the early 1830s. In that tradition, citizens interested in preserving the local history associated with Poe, and his legacy in America's journalistic world, formed the non-profit, organization Poe Baltimore. This new group was responsible for the reopening of the Poe House on May 24th.

Poe was a pioneer in the creation of the short stories and detective mysteries. He is studied and examined in writing classes throughout the world. His life was certainly nonconformist and significantly strange. Having family connections in Baltimore since childhood, it is no surprise that he was found dead in a Baltimore street in 1849, at the age of 40.

After the city of Baltimore did not choose to fund various museums, Poe Baltimore was organized to fund, maintain and interpret the Poe House, and indeed one of Baltimore's most famous citizens. The Poe House offers tourism and educational opportunities. These opportunities are only enhanced by the name of Baltimore's football team, The Ravens. Thank you, Mr. Poe.

Baltimoreans can enhance this legacy by supporting Poe Baltimore.

Fletcher R. Hall, Ruxton

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • No dancing on Red Line's grave

    No dancing on Red Line's grave

    Spare us the dancing on the grave of the Red Line by those who have no right to call it a boondoggle ("Red Line was a boondoggle," June 30). We'll never know if it was or not since it won't be built in my lifetime. Certainly, I can't foresee any of Baltimore's myriad social problems improving without...

  • Ban smokeless tobacco from baseball

    Ban smokeless tobacco from baseball

    It is time for Major League Baseball to take a stand and ban smokeless tobacco, period. It is a foul, disgusting and dangerous addiction. It's never talked about until you hear of a player or former player who is diagnosed with mouth cancer or a player such as Tony Gwynn dies from the disease (...

  • EPA mercury ruling was even-handed

    EPA mercury ruling was even-handed

    The Sun's article on mercury limits incorrectly asserts that the U.S. Supreme Court split on ideological grounds ("Justices rule against EPA power plant mercury limits," June 29). On the contrary, the Supreme Court split was one between original intent, honest interpretations of the Constitution...

  • Reimer was The Sun's best

    Reimer was The Sun's best

    Congratulations to Susan Reimer on her retirement. I will definitely miss her column. It was the only thing worth reading in what they call The Sun ("Susan Reimer signs off," June 25).

  • Clean air with taxes, not regulations

    Clean air with taxes, not regulations

    Though the recent Supreme Court ruling against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's power plant emissions regulations was disappointing, I was happy to see The Sun emphasize the example our state has set by implementing strict anti-pollution laws in the article, "Justices rule against EPA...

  • Schools need resources, not reform

    Schools need resources, not reform

    There are so many assumptions embedded within Donald Manekin's recent commentary that I find problematic that I'm not sure where to even begin ("Reinventing Baltimore's schools," June 29).

Comments
Loading

79°