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News Opinion Readers Respond

Failure of pit bull bill will cause havoc

Now that our lawmakers have failed to pass breed-neutral legislation that would overturn the court ruling that declared one breed of dog dangerous, thousands of Maryland voters and their pets will unfairly be affected ("General Assembly session ends in flurry of votes," April 9).

We counted on legislators to right a wrong that was already causing a negative impact in homes and animal shelters in Maryland. This did not happen.

The direct impact from the lack of compromise between our legislators will lead to more landlords burdened with the responsibility of determining a dog's breed and forcing tenants to choose between their home and their pets; more Marylanders having to give up their beloved pets; and an increase in abandoned pit-bull type dogs in already crowded animal shelters.

It's unsettling that our lawmakers did not listen to our voices. By not acting during this session, they upheld a law that discriminates against a certain dog type — a law that will certainly cause havoc in the lives of many of their constituents.

Aileen Gabbey, Baltimore

The writer is executive director of the Maryland SPCA.

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