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Patterson High: Freezing in winter, broiling in summer [Letter]

I was at Patterson High School for 17 years, and during that time we had numerous days when the rooms were below 30 degrees in winter and more than 90 degrees in summer ("Plea for help from Patterson High," Jan. 13).

Complaints would be lodged with the school department's central office; then a facilities person would come out, check the temperatures, and report that "nothing was out of normal ranges."

Kids and teachers got sick, asthma was triggered, and still nothing. The problem is that the school does not have a large enough power supply coming in to it to make major renovations in the HVAC system.

The solution will probably be to tear down the school and build a new one. In the meantime, students and staff suffer. I am amazed they do as well as they do in that building.

Incidentally, Patterson still has its original elevator, which consistently breaks down. They were supposed to install a new one more than five years ago. Has it happened? No, but other schools have gotten major renovations since then. Just saying.

Joan Gardiner

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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