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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Why didn't Oklahoma close schools?

A tornado of epic proportions hit Oklahoma, which claims to have the finest weather forecasting in the nation specifically because of the tornado threat ("Tornado in Oklahoma leaves dozens dead," May 21). These forecasters note when tornadoes are imminent and attempt to save lives through warning.

The day after the first tornado hit, and when all the conditions for more tornadoes remained a danger, the children were sent to school like always. Compare this to how Maryland shuts down the state merely on the rumor of snow. Many children were in school when the second, even more monstrous tornado, cut a swath a mile wide and sixty miles long.

My question is, with the superior weather forecasting, with the existing conditions still in effect, with the threat so very high of more and worse to come, why were the children sent to school?

Douglas B. Hermann, Parkville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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