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How can Obama defend domestic spying?

There is no way a president can defend spying on law-abiding citizens ("Lawmakers defend NSA monitoring phone calls," June 7). We have the Fourth Amendment giving everyone the right "to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures."

The data mining going on at the NSA is an abomination and violates the every concept of freedom. If there were probable cause to search someone's telephone history or online Internet usage, fine — but to create a massive dragnet gathering information on each of us is repugnant and shocking.

Now PRISM raises its ugly head. Looks like NSA is collecting even more data on all that trivia you see on Facebook, YouTube or other social media sites. When I search something using Google, I guess there's a record of that too.

And what about the letters we mail, the books we check out from the library, the television programs we watch, what we bought with a credit card last year, or where we will travel with E-Z Pass today — the list is mind boggling. And don't get me started on drones, face recognition protocol or nanotechnology!

When our government sees every American citizen as an enemy combatant, the terrorists have won. It's time for brave folk to stand up and insist the rights spelled out in the Constitution be returned. Verizongate may just be the beginning of something really ugly!

Rosalind Ellis Heid, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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