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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

No blank check to the NSA on privacy rights

Reader David Liddle writes that "since I have nothing to hide and would like to protect myself and my family from terrorists, I have no problem with the government looking at my emails and listening to my phone calls" ("'Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12).

I would ask if he sees any value in the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution guaranteeing privacy from government intrusion? Would he prefer to live under a totalitarian government that spies on all its citizens in order to silence dissent?

I need more information about what our government is doing before forming an opinion, but I definitely would not support giving the government the unfettered right to trample everyone's privacy whenever and wherever it wants.

Jay Ziegler

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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