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News Opinion Readers Respond

Why does the world stand by while girls are missing in Nigeria? [Letter]

Wow, it sure has taken a long time for this story to get out! Last month over 20 young girls were kidnapped! Talk about "snail news!" ("Nigeria sect threatens to sell abducted girls into slavery," May 6.)

I learned the story just a week ago from a family member who went to Washington trying to make people aware of this horror. I've contacted my senator suggesting countries place sanctions on Nigeria until the girls are returned unharmed and proposed that the United Nations get involved. I ave no have idea if this will happen.

Slavery has been outlawed internationally, and plenty of human rights groups exist to condemn and punish organizations or individuals guilty of human trafficking — where are these folk?

Perhaps the World Economic Forum will cancel their upcoming conference taking place in Nigeria. Slavery should not be countenanced as part of today's economy; and as long as the girls are headed for the auction block, the decent thing to do would be to find another venue for this economic gathering.

It is horrifying Western education can place someone in harm's way, but if this is the case in Nigeria, the parents — if they were aware of these fanatical beliefs — should not have allowed their children to become targets.

This story sickens and disgusts me. Why is the United Nations silent? Where are the all the human rights groups that I support?

Roz Heid

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