Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

There's a reason why Europe didn't invent Netflix

Netflix's multiple Emmy nominations are evidence that the Internet economy continues to thrive ("Baltimore-made 'House of Cards' makes history with major Emmy nominations," July 18). But surprisingly, critics of the industry are looking right past this evidence to demand that regulators tinker with the marketplace.

Despite the trillion-plus dollars invested in America's broadband networks since President Bill Clinton signed the Telecommunication Act in 1996, pro-regulation advocates claim investment has dried up. Despite being one of only two countries with competing wired broadband technologies and nearly total coverage of blazing-fast LTE wireless networks, we are told that America's Internet market lacks competition. Despite top 10 global rankings in peak speeds and in connections faster than 10 Mbps, critics claim that we have fallen behind on speed. Despite an "app economy" that has created 752,000 jobs for entrepreneurs from all walks of life, critics allege that smartphones are not driving economic growth. And yes, despite the dozens of choices for watching online video and the financial and critical success of companies like Netflix, we hear that America's broadband networks threaten the success of companies like Netflix.

The proposed cures for these "ills" range from forcing ISPs to share their lines with competitors to having the government build rival broadband networks with taxpayer funds. But neither solution is bearing fruit in Europe, where speed and competition between technologies lag behind the U.S. But perhaps most tellingly, applications like Netflix aren't being invented in Europe. The U.S. continues to be a hotbed of online innovation precisely because our Internet infrastructure is in excellent health.

Sincerely,

Jose Marquez, Norcross, Ga.

The writer is national president and CEO of Latinos in Information Sciences and Technology.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • 'Rain tax' repeal makes for a stronger law
    'Rain tax' repeal makes for a stronger law

    With the end of Maryland's legislative session and the passage of SB 863, which repealed the Republican dubbed "rain tax" (properly, the stormwater remediation fee), many believed that protection for the Chesapeake Bay against pollution might have diminished ("Repeal of 'rain tax' requirement yet...

  • AFL-CIO: Where are Mikulski, Cardin, Hoyer, Harris and Delaney on fast track?
    AFL-CIO: Where are Mikulski, Cardin, Hoyer, Harris and Delaney on fast track?

    Recently, we heard that five members of Maryland's Congressional Delegation committed to stand with working families and vote no on pending fast track trade authority legislation ("Give Obama 'fast track' authority," April 17). The decision by Reps. Elijah Cummings, Donna Edwards, C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger,...

  • Just who is paying women less, and how?
    Just who is paying women less, and how?

    In reference to the April 19 article by Lorraine Mirabella about gender-based pay disparities ("Gender-based pay disparities persist in Maryland"): Society is well aware there's a pay gap problem. Now it's time to concentrate on a fix, like pay scales. To fix the pay gap problem, identify the where...

  • The virtues of instant replay
    The virtues of instant replay

    Replay and Review has been used in Major League Baseball in some form for a little less than three years. Every year has seen a change in the exact operations, and this past season was clearly the biggest change yet ("Some thoughts on MLB's new pace of game measures and modified replay rules,"...

  • What's in a 'mandate'?
    What's in a 'mandate'?

    Many Maryland conservatives think the General Assembly should bow to the "mandate" Gov. Larry Hogan won in last year's election.

  • The Sun's southern sympathies
    The Sun's southern sympathies

    The Sun's editorial-writing forebears were wrong about President Abraham Lincoln, but their errors extended far beyond the president ("The Sun and President Lincoln," April 17).

Comments
Loading

61°