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Newseum wrong to honor propagandists

A museum of journalism in Washington, D.C., the Newseum plans to honor and include in the institution's Journalists' Memorial Mahmoud Al-Kumi and Hussam Salama. Both worked for Hamas' Al-Aqsa TV. Also, Basel Tawfiq Youssef of Syrian State TV and Maya Naser, from Iran's Press TV are set to be honored.

They did not fall as reporters attempting to maintain the free flow of news. The honorees died as foot soldiers for regimes that use propaganda to sustain their repression and abuse of a free society and a free press. Al-Aqsa TV uses propaganda to air violent and virulent anti-Semitic incitement, such as urging Palestinians to "harvest the skulls of the Jews."

Lets not forget, according to the U.S. government, Al-Aqsa TV is a sophisticated propaganda unit of the terrorist group Hamas controlling the Gaza Strip. Syrian State TV serves diligently the bloody dictatorship of Bashar al-Assad, and Press TV functions for Iran's radical and dangerous regime.

Is this how Newseum "educates the public about the value of a free press in a free society?"

Ziva Giliya, Timonium

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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