Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Ehrlich traffics in xenophobia

The xenophobic views espoused by Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his column ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy" June 2) couldn't be more inflammatory or outrageous. As a proud adopted Asian-American (actually, Mr. Ehrlich would clearly prefer just American or American-Asian) I find this column an insult to the generations of immigrants who have built this country.

While those in Mr. Ehrlich's camp spout the dangers of foreigners and the superiority of pure "American culture," one has to wonder just what is American culture? Perhaps I should point out that apple pie originated in Europe (meaning it's obviously socialist pie), the stock market and free-market capitalism had its beginnings in Europe as well and that personal freedoms so loved by Republicans originated within British history.

The very origins of this nation came about through separatism as the Founding Fathers broke away from the British Empire with the help of a very multicultural Continental Army. This "uniquely American culture" is a cobbling together of cultures from around the world, the very diversity of which makes it so welcoming to immigrants. American culture is a constantly changing and is a democratic entity in of itself. Our culture is shaped and formed by the people who live in this nation, to say otherwise is an insult to the spirit of America.

Paul Sweemer, Catonsville

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Middle class value claims are a 'joke' [Commentary]
    Middle class value claims are a 'joke' [Commentary]

    It's the political season, which explains another column of "Things That Bug Me." Herewith my latest list for your consideration:

  • Ehrlich mistaken on tax burden
    Ehrlich mistaken on tax burden

    Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. does not look at the big picture. Is this because he is not interested in giving a fair presentation? In his most recent column (tax bill for government at all levels.

  • What Obama should have said
    What Obama should have said

    Here is what President Barack Obama should have said when he addressed the American people after his party's massive losses in Tuesday's election:

  • American values under Obama
    American values under Obama

    Two columns ago, I passed on a series of political observations from the heartland. Today, a snapshot of American values and viewpoints a decade and a half into the "new" millennium.

  • Hillary all over again
    Hillary all over again

    With the exception of President Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton is the most recognized American politician of this era. Today, she is far and away the Democratic front runner for president. Many believe she is the odds on favorite to win it all — a view supported by a variety of public...

  • Ehrlich's delusions of grandeur
    Ehrlich's delusions of grandeur

    The Sun's front page recently carried the article, "Ehrlich entertains presidential hopes" (Dec. 3), yet it was not April 1. Surely, this was a joke. It's even more preposterous than Martin O'Malley running for president!

Comments
Loading