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The age of dictators and religious zealots is over

The recent article on multiculturalism by Bob Ehrlich ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2) and the response by Wally Pinkard ("America is more than baseball and apple pie," June 7) have opened up a credible discussion on the root causes of political philosophy. I applaud The Sun for offering this polemic for readers to digest and learn from. The advantages of immigration and multiculturalism to the world and the U.S. are so obvious that they do not need discussion. The root cause of the multiculturalism debate is religious secularism and intolerance.

The current Sunni/Shia battle for religious dominance in the Middle East could lead to a World War. If Muslims or Christians do view themselves as followers of Christ or Mohammed first and citizens second (as opined by Mr. Ehrlich) that sets the stage for possible conflagration.

In the 21st century with the advance of science and technology it is stunning that religious extremists literally believe in the Biblical talking snake in the Garden of Eden (ironically located in the Middle East), or the need for Jihad. Osama bin Laden was too well educated (in America and in Saudi Arabia) to actually believe that America and the rest of the world would go back in time to the 11th century version of Islamic fundamentalism. The genie of truth has come out of the bottle. There will always be a cultural struggle for power, but the age of dictators and religious zealots is over. Some of them like Bashar Assad in Syria just have not read the memo, but it is coming.

Blake Goldsmith, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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