Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

The jury ignored common sense in the Zimmerman verdict

George ZimmermanLaws and LegislationTrayvon Martin

The jurors in George Zimmerman's trial for the murder of Trayvon Martin claim they followed the rule of law in their acquittal. Let's set aside for the moment the flagrant abuses allowed under Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law and focus instead on the rule of common sense. There is such a rule: evidence stating what a reasonable person considers as truth.

Mr. Zimmerman's acquittal turned on the claim of self-defense, imminent bodily harm and a fear for his life. When you consider an unarmed teenager being stalked by an individual appearing out of the darkness, who had a better reason to fear bodily harm? Mr. Martin clearly feared for his safety, if not for his life, when he asked, "Why are you following me?"

Mr. Zimmerman had no such fear and apparently was only too eager to confront someone he perceived as a criminal. The evidence indicated that Mr. Zimmermans's wounds were superficial and hardly life-threatening. And statements that Mr. Martin reached for Mr. Zimmerman's gun were physically impossible and obviously contrived.

Justice falls victim when common sense is ignored.

Jerome Shapiro, Pikesville

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
George ZimmermanLaws and LegislationTrayvon Martin
Comments
Loading