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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

How does same-sex marriage threaten anyone?

Opponents to marriage equality and Question 6 claim that allowing same-sex couples to marry — and achieve the legal rights and responsibilities of a state (not religiously) sanctioned marriage — is a threat to heterosexual marriage and the American family.

My husband and I have been married for 22 years. Over those years, our marriage has been threatened by our jobs, our finances, our extended families, the demands of caring for our children, and, yes, our own imperfections. Same-sex couples have never been a threat to our marriage.

As children, our lives were complicated by our parents' troubled marriages, which were undermined by their immaturity, selfishness, addictions and, in my home, a divorce followed by multiple remarriages. Same-sex couples were never a threat to our childhoods or our parents' marriages.

Our grandparents' marriages were marred by, among other things, domestic violence, alcoholism, philandering and pervasive gender inequality. I'm pretty sure that same-sex couples were never a threat to their marriages or families.

The truth is, generations of married and unmarried heterosexuals have been undermining the "sanctity" of marriage for generations. And it's not hard to name vociferous proponents of traditional family values who have been caught not practicing what they preach.

The same-sex couples and gay individuals I know respect and desire marriage and family and the commitment both require. Allowing two loving adults to wed strengthens, not threatens, marriage and families.

Melissa Goodman, Davidsonville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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