Summer Savings! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.
Readers Respond
News Opinion Readers Respond

The reality behind the myth of Britain's 'Iron Lady'

While the mainstream media in America love to wax poetic about former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, the sainted "Iron Lady" of the Cold War, it might be wise to remember the real person behind the carefully polished myth ("Margaret Thatcher made history by standing firm," April 11).

Let's not forget that while she often played up her "blue collar" roots, her sudden rise to fame and fortune was actually bankrolled by her husband Dennis, a millionaire businessman, and that her economic policies resulted in the disappearance of countless small businesses and their replacement by mega-corporations like Walmart.

We should also remember that at the time Mrs. Thatcher, and her American counterpart, Ronald Reagan, were busy smashing trade unions at home, they were heaping praise on the workers in communist Eastern Europe and lauding their unions as instruments for bringing freedom.

One has to wonder why Mrs. Thatcher felt freedom was so important to workers in Poland, but not in Great Britain.

Above all, we should never forget that Mrs. Thatcher was a staunch supporter of apartheid in South Africa who opposed the release of Nelson Mandela from prison and labeled him a "terrorist." She even reversed long-standing British foreign policy by hosting a state visit for white South African President P.W. Botha in 1984.

Although I would at least hope that her position on South Africa was based less on racism than on her willingness to put money above human freedom, either way her actions revealed a lot about her true character.

William Smith, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Thatcher and the Falklands

    Thatcher and the Falklands

    Regarding the recent article, "Argentine leader not on list for Thatcher funeral" (April 12), it seems logical that to me Great Britain did not invite Cristina Fernandez, the president of Argentina to Margaret Thatcher's funeral. The news item, however, labels this "a snub likely to deepen a diplomatic...

  • Thatcher made history by standing firm

    Thatcher made history by standing firm

    Jonah Goldberg says Margaret Thatcher's embrace of free markets forced change on both her friends and her enemies

  • Baltimore needs BRT

    Baltimore needs BRT

    Recently, Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford announced that Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) should be considered as an alternative instead of the now-shelved Red Line light rail system ("Who knew Hogan, Rutherford were such transit geeks," July 15). Why? Costs. Light rail is extremely expensive — to the tune of...

  • Iran deal — war now or war later

    Iran deal — war now or war later

    In its recent editorial, The Sun adopts President Barack Obama's primary argument in favor of the Iran deal — that the only choice is the deal or war ("A 'good enough' agreement," July 24). No one wants war. But the choice here is not war or no war. It is war now or war later.

  • The evil of Iran

    The evil of Iran

    We sat 5,000-plus strong in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in the District of Columbia for three intense days of Christians United For Israel (CUFI) 10th summit on July 12-14. We came from all across the nation (including 95 members from other countries and 500 college students). We...

  • Orioles: No gnomes, please

    Orioles: No gnomes, please

    In light of the Orioles recent near-death spiral, many fans have pinned the blame on the Buck Showalter Garden Gnome giveaway ("Buck Showalter garden gnome briefly causes long lines at Camden Yards," June 28). True, their record since the promotion has been dismal and Buck Showalter was warned...

  • Baltimore remains a fiber desert

    Baltimore remains a fiber desert

    Like Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's Smarter Baltimore draft report, the commentary, "Broadband for Baltimore" (July 27), has solid recommendations for building high speed Internet in Baltimore. But like that report, it ignores the principal reason that Baltimore City doesn't have broadband. Verizon's...

  • Trump is the anti-politician

    Trump is the anti-politician

    Why are the press and both political parties so upset that Donald Trump is running for president ("The Trump lesson that Bush and Clinton should heed," July 27)? Could it be that he does not need someone else's money so the Democratic National Committee, GOP, George Soros or big business can't...

Comments
Loading
79°