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Manning mental health an issue

Is he a whistle blower or traitor? It can be argued either way, but the critical issue in the case of Pfc. Bradley Manning is his mental health ("Officer: Manning tightly confined to prevent suicide," Nov. 29).

When I attended one of the days of hearings at Fort Meade last year, I was struck by how young and vulnerable he appeared. It is difficult to understand how the military trusted him with important secure data when he exhibited behavior that was a cry for help. He is the size of an average 8th grader, and I am sure that makes his ability to adjust to military life extremely difficult.

It is my opinion that the military should take more responsibility for the action he took and place him in an environment that is appropriate to address his mental health issues and definitely not in solitary as he was placed at Quantico.

I would encourage the media to continue to report the progress of Private Manning's case.

Patricia Ranney, Millersville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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